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William Shakespeare - Macbeth

                                     
   
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Poems
 
   
 

A varity of poems written about Macbeth

Out, Out---"
"Don't let him cut my hand off" pleads the young boy. Like Macbeth "he saw all spoiled" before he entered "the dark of ether."

The buzz-saw snarled and rattled in the yard
And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,
Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.
And from there those that lifted eyes could count
Five mountain ranges one behind the other
Under the sunset far into Vermont.
And the saw snarled and rattled, snarled and rattled,
As it ran light, or had to bear a load.
And nothing happened: day was all but done.
Call it a day, I wish they might have said
To please the boy by giving him the half hour
That a boy counts so much when saved from work.
His sister stood beside them in her apron
To tell them 'Supper'. At the word, the saw,
As if to prove saws knew what supper meant,
Leaped out at the boy's hand, or seemed to leap--
He must have given the hand. However it was,
Neither refused the meeting. But the hand!
The boy's first outcry was a rueful laugh.
As he swung toward them holding up the hand
Half in appeal, but half as if to keep
The life from spilling. Then the boy saw all--
Since he was old enough to know, big boy
Doing a man's work, though a child at heart--
He saw all spoiled. 'Don't let him cut my hand off
The doctor, when he comes. Don't let him, sister!'
So. But the hand was gone already.
The doctor put him in the dark of ether.
He lay and puffed his lips out with his breath.
And then -- the watcher at his pulse took fright.
No one believed. They listened at his heart.
Little -- less -- nothing! -- and that ended it.
No more to build on there. And they, since they
Were not the one dead, turned to their affairs.

                                         By: Robert Frost

 

At the Fire and Cauldron Health Food restaurant
The weird Sisters aren't the only ones who know how to "serve a strange buffet."

Here we serve a stange buffet;
tender snake and shark fillet;
eye of newt, and toe of frog
wool of bat, and tongue of dog.
Bubble, bubble, it;s worth our trouble,
organic cooking cost you double.

Daily specials packed with health,
stuff we've gathered up with stealth:
adder's fork and blindworm's sting,
Lizard's leg and howlet's wing.
fire burn and cauldron bubble,
our food charms your stomach trouble,

Buzzard's nest soup or witches' brew,
moon-grown mushrooms grace our stew:
fill your plate with healtful weeds,
burdrock root and fennel seeds.
In thunder, lighting or in rain,
we'll fix old potions for your pain.

Here we mix our recipes
stocked from nature's pharmacies:
order food medicinal
at the Weird Sisters' table.
We don't give you paper fortunes,
here you'll see your future's portents.

Change your past, with what you eat:
give up beef, its not too late.
Munch on grains, we cook 'em whole,
cow gas spreads the ozone hole,
Forest stubble, fear and trouble
heaven burns, your planet bubbles.

By: Martin Robbins

 

Paul Hewitt
Does Shakespear deal with real life? Just how relevant is a study of a play like Macbeth to the average person?

Please, sir, I don’t mean to be disrespectful.

I did raise my hand.

I mean, who cares if Macbeth becomes a monster,

If Huck Finn rescues Jim,

If Willie Loman never finds happiness?

They’re just characters in books.

What have they got to do with me?

I mean, I’m never going hunting for white whales.

I’m never going to fght in the Civil War.

And I certainly don’t live in the Dust Bowl.

 

Tell me instead how to

Make money, pick up girls.

Then maybe I’ll listen.

You got any books that deal with real life?

 

By Mel Glenn

 

Macbeth

Macbeth's smoldering ambition,
witch struck and lady
kindled.
left his ashen
conscience
floating daggers
in the smoke.

By: Liz Newall

 

Abstracts from Shakespeare

In fact Macbeth
listened to his wife
then killed her
placed her in bed
beside dead Duncan
told the court
he caught tham at it
killed them both:
thus he gained
the crown, a reputation
as a man of principle
and died, old,
in bed.

By: Desmond Graham

 

 

 

 
   
 

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